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Bungo to Alchemist Wiki

CHARACTER STATS (BASIC/MAX)
精神
State of Mind
Stable
攻撃
Attack
135 /
防御
Defense
140 /
回避
Evasion
10 /
技術
Technique
45 /
天才
Talent
50 /

Aesthetics
40 /
主題
Theme
50 /
真実
Realism
50 /
PROFILE

ロシアを代表する大作家。フルネームはフョードル・ミハイロヴィチ・ドストエフスキーで、トルストイは親しみを込めてフェージャと呼ぶ。侵蝕者との戦いでは頼もしい活躍を見せる一方で普段の生活では素行の悪さが目立つ。規律も守らないことから「図書館一扱いにくい男」と呼ばれている。賭博狂いでカジノゲームが大好き。

A literary giant representing Russia. His full name is Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, and Tolstoy calls him "Fedya" in a friendly manner. He is reliable and proactive in the battle against the Taints, but on the other hand his conduct in his daily life is infamously poor. As he doesn't follow the rules, he's called "the Library's most difficult man". He's a gambling addict and loves casino games.


Trivia


  • Dostoevsky went through much of Leo Tolstoy's works with jealousy, after being overshadowed by the younger writer. There was no other work he wrote more on than Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, which he both praised and criticized. Dostoevsky even suspected (falsely) the reason he got offered so little for his A Raw Youth was because Tolstoy was getting paid so much for that novel. Despite his criticism and disdain for the aristocrat's "landowner literature", Dostoevsky too admired Tolstoy's talent and also desired to meet him.[1]
  • Tolstoy's great aunt invited Dostoevsky over and shared her correspondence with her nephew on his radical beliefs to the more devout Christian. Dostoevsky was also shocked and did not sympathize with any of Tolstoy's ideas, but took those letters (and even the copies made) with him, possibly to refute them. The two never got to meet, as Dostoevsky died 5 days after.[2]
  • While they never met, Tolstoy and Dostoevsky communicated largely through the critic, Strakhov. Strakhov was a trusted family friend of the Dostoevsky's, collaborated with them, and was even designated as Fyodor's biographer. After Dostoevsky died, Strakhov wrote a letter to Tolstoy lamenting the death. Tolstoy responded with similar feelings of sorrow and admiration, expressing how he realized that Dostoevsky was "the man nearest, most dear and most needed" to him.[1]
  • Strakhov grew colder to Dostoevsky (especially after befriending Tolstoy) and his support was insincere, even while writing Dostoevsky's biography. Strakhov slandered his "friend" in another letter to Tolstoy after the biography was published, two years after Dostoevsky's death. Strakhov listed wild accusations about Dostoevsky, but Tolstoy lightly dismissed them and replied with how he felt Strakhov (and everyone) judged the man wrongly.[1][3]
  • The infamous letter from Strakhov to Tolstoy was displayed publicly in 1913 (the two men had died by then), and upon discovery, Dostoevsky's wife defended her husband against the slander. Attempting to grasp Strakhov's intent of sending the letter, she hypothesized that Strakhov was spiteful of Tolstoy's verbal praise and sincere admiration for the man, and wanted to "diminish Dostoevsky in Tolstoy's eyes".[3]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Dostoevsky: His Life and Work. By Konstantin Mochulsky, Константин Мочульский, Mochul'skij Konstantin Vasil'evič · 1967
  2. Lantz, Kenneth A. The Dostoevsky Encyclopedia. Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Dostoevsky, Anna Gregorevna. Dostoevsky Portrayed by his Wife: The Diary and Reminiscences of Mme. Dostoevsky . Valmy Publishing.
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